Woman arrested for pointing gun at assessor

Subhead

A St. Marys woman is facing three felony charges after a county assessor called 911 last week and said she pointed a gun at him, took his phone and told him to leave. She called 911, too, saying that there was a man in front of her house who wouldn’t leave. St. Marys police officers answered...

Image
  • .
    .
Body

A St. Marys woman is facing three felony charges after a county assessor called 911 last week and said she pointed a gun at him, took his phone and told him to leave. She called 911, too, saying that there was a man in front of her house who wouldn’t leave.

St. Marys police officers answered the 911 calls around 10:40 a.m. Sept. 22 in downtown and spoke with the assessor and Emily Melissa Trower. They arrested Trower, 25, for armed robbery, aggravated assault and possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony.

The assessor told officers that he was sitting in his marked county vehicle in the street and had come to see a house across the street from Trower’s, according to the arrest warrant and incident report. He was also wearing a badge with his name on his shirt, which also had the county logo on it.

“I was reviewing parcel information on my assigned iPad. I heard a knock on the window and a young lad was at the passenger window,” he said in a written statement. “I rolled the window down and she asked what I was doing here. I told her that I worked for the Camden County Assessor’s Office. She asked if I tried to get in her house and I said no. I was looking at (the other house). She said someone tried to get into my house.”

As Trower walked away, the assessor noticed that she had a gun in her hand and heard her asking who had been in the backyard and tried to get into her house. The assessor stayed in his car and Trower came back, pointed the gun at him and told him to leave or she’d shoot him.

“I told her I was going to call 911. I got my cell phone and decided to take a picture of her in case she shot me,” the assessor told police.

He took a photo — that he later showed to police — of her pointing a gun at him and she took his phone. The assessor got out of his car and asked for his phone back, so he could call 911. She threw his phone on the pavement and went inside her house. The assessor retrieved his phone, called 911 and moved his car farther down the street to wait for police, according to the warrant.

St. Marys officer Cynthia Cartagena arrived first, spoke briefly to the assessor, then went to the house to see Trower who was distraught, crying and shaking. Trower said she’d heard a noise in the backyard, the back door was ajar and she thought the man sitting in a car outside was trying to break in. She was scared and called her boyfriend to ask where his gun was.

Cartagena asked if she’d seen the logos on his shirt and car. She said that she hadn’t but she assumed they were fakes because people can put anything on a shirt or car. She told police that she asked the assessor to identify himself but he wouldn’t and she told him to leave several times. She went back inside, took the bullets out of her boyfriend’s handgun, then went outside, pointed the gun at the assessor and told him to leave.

“I asked her why she needed to bring the gun out (of) the home unloaded,” Cartagena wrote in the warrant. “Ms. Trower stated she just wanted to scare him off. She stated she informed (the assessor) the weapon was unloaded while aiming it at him. Ms. Trower returned to her residence and contacted 911.”

Trower asked Cartagena to come inside and see the back door. While Cartagena looked, Trower was on speaker phone with her boyfriend who said he’d left the door unlocked that morning. Trower also pointed out the empty gun and the bullets she had removed, which Cartagena took as evidence.

Trower’s boyfriend came home then and spoke with Cartagena. He said Trower had called him scared that someone was trying to break in and had asked about the gun. He told her how to unload the gun but didn’t know that she had left the house with it.

Trower spent six days in jail before being released on a $40,350 bond.